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Barney Finucane

Welcome to my BeyeNETWORK blog. My main goal here is to address hype issues that come up in the Internet, not to provide any overview of the BI market itself. I look forward to any questions or comments you may have.

About the author >

Barney Finucane has extensive experience in the BI industry. As a consultant, he has supported companies in the chemical, energy and manufacturing sector with the introduction of BI software. As product manager for the company MIS, he was responsible for the front-end products Plain and onVision, and kept a keen eye on projects and tools from other vendors. His areas of speciality include tool selection, quality assurance for BI, data warehouse strategies and their architectures.

The key part of Alphago is a convolutional neural network. These are usually used for recognizing cat pictures and other visual tasks, and progress in the last five years has been incredible.
Alphago went from the level of a novice pro last October to world champion level for this match. It did so by playing itself over and over again.
Chess programs are well understood because they are programmed by humans. Alphago is uses an algorithm to pick a winning move in a given go position. But the heart of the program is a learning program to find that algorithm, not the algorithm itself.
Go programs made steady progress for a decade with improved tree pruning methods, which reduce the total number of positions the program has to evaluate. The cleverest method is Monte Carlo pruning, which simply prunes at random. 

Posted March 13, 2016 6:00 AM
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