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Andy Hayler

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Andy Hayler is one of the world’s foremost experts on master data management. Andy started his career with Esso as a database administrator and, among other things, invented a “decompiler” for ADF, enabling a dramatic improvement in support efforts in this area.  He became the youngest ever IT manager for Esso Exploration before moving to Shell. As Technology Planning Manager of Shell UK he conducted strategy studies that resulted in significant savings for the company.  Andy then became Principal Technology Consultant for Shell international, engaging in significant software evaluation and procurement projects at the enterprise level.  He then set up a global information management consultancy business which he grew from scratch to 300 staff. Andy was architect of a global master data and data warehouse project for Shell downstream which attained USD 140M of annual business benefits. 

Andy founded Kalido, which under his leadership was the fastest growing business intelligence vendor in the world in 2001.  Andy was the only European named in Red Herring’s “Top 10 Innovators of 2002”.  Kalido was a pioneer in modern data warehousing and master data management.

He is now founder and CEO of The Information Difference, a boutique analyst and market research firm, advising corporations, venture capital firms and software companies.   He is a regular keynote speaker at international conferences on master data management, data governance and data quality. He is also a respected restaurant critic and author (www.andyhayler.com).  Andy has an award-winning blog www.andyonsoftware.com.  He can be contacted at Andy.hayler@informationdifference.com.

 

Yesterday Informatica announced that it was being bought, not by a software firm but by a private equity company Permira. At £5.3 billion, this values the data integration vendor at over five times the billion dollar revenue that Informatica saw in 2014, compared to an industry average of 4.4 recently. This piece of financial engineering will not change the operational strategy for Informatica. Rather it is a reflection of a time when capital is plentiful and private equity firms are feeling bullish about the software sector. Tibco and Dell have followed a similar route. Company managers will not have to worry about quarterly earnings briefings to pesky financial analysts, and will instead be accountable only to their new owners. However, private equity firms seek a return on their investment, usually leveraging plenty of debt into such deals (debt is tax efficient compared to equity), and can be demanding of their acquisitions. From a customer viewpoint there is little to be concerned about. One exit for the investors will be a future trade sale or return to the stock market, so this deal does not in itself change the picture for Informatica in terms of possible acquisition by a bigger software company one day.


Posted April 8, 2015 9:55 AM
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